Re-upholstering benches: Make one, or place your custom order!

Today I'm re-posting a tutorial I shared one year ago, almost to the day!  I get questions about upholstering every couple months, and while I do not do large pieces like sofas, and arm chairs, I DO simple pieces.....like stools and benches.  Here is a simple step by step tutorial for you, if you are so inclined to tackle a little bench of your own!  If you don't want to do your own, I am happy to help......contact me! 

Stools and benches are EVERYWHERE in second hand stores.  They are one of the most versatile and easy to update pieces, but often they are quite ugly upon first sight.  If you can look past the ugliness, however, you are one step ahead....and on your way to having an awesome accent piece for your home. 

Don't let upholstering scare you!  It's easier than it looks.  This is a simple tutorial on what you can do with your bench/stool! 

Here is what you'll need:

  • Staple gun
  • Fabric
  • Fabric scissors
  • screw driver
  • Foam cushion (or pillow "stuffing" sometimes works) You can find these at Hobby Lobby, Joann Fabrics, or Michael's. 
  • Stool or bench (old piano benches are great for this)

 

Consider using fabric with bold patterns and colors that accentuate or compliment your home interior.  

 

 

 

 

 

TIP: fabric scissors work best. If your scissors is even slightly dull, cutting fabric will become a strongly disliked task! Trust me! 

 

 

 

TIP:  foam cushions work best and provide a firmer surface for your bench, but "stuffing" or batting can also work.  Batting that comes in sheets is easier to work with than batting bunched up in a ball.  

The photo to the left shows a sheet of batting. You can double up your layers to create a thicker seat cushion. 

Here's how:

1.  Flip the bench on its back.  You'll see screws in each corner.  Unscrew those using a screw driver.  Once all screws are out, the top of the bench should pop right off.

2.  Remove the old foam and fabric from the wood base.  You will see staples securing the old fabric to the wood base.  To remove the staples use a flat screw driver and try to wiggle your way under the staple. Then pry it up. Sometimes you'll pry off only one end of a taple. If that happens you can use a pliers to pull the other end out. 

3.  Now you have your bare bench/stool frame.  Painting the base is optional but remember to paint before adding the new fabric/upholstery! 

Below is the bench base right after the cushion/seat was removed.    On the right the bench base has been painted green! Just more fun, don't you think?

4.  Cut your foam piece to size.  Your foam or batting layer should be slightly larger (a centimeter or less) than the seat of the bench, on all four sides.  This is necessary so that the hard/wood edges of the bench base are fully covered.   In the picture below, two layers of batting are used instead of a foam cushion.  Either works. 

5.  Once your foam/batting is cut. Cut your fabric.  I usually leave about 2 inhes of extra fabric all the way around the bench base. Having a little more fabric around the edges makes "wrapping" it to the bench a little easier.  In the above picture you can see the fabric extends a couple more inches beyond the batting/base of bench.  

So, this will be the order of your pieces:  1. fabric lying flat, 2. cushion or batting layers laying on top the fabric, 3. bench base (usually made of wood)

6.  Start "wrapping" your base/foam layers like a present.  Start with the corners and work your way around the wood base, pulling tightly and stapling as you go.  Tip: when pulling the fabric, be careful not to pull too hard. You don't want to use up all the fabric on one side, and not have enough left on the other side to pull over your wood base.  

Below the fabric is wrapped around the entire bench base and cushion. Staples secure it to the bottom of the wood base: 

Tip:  When you are wrapping the fabric, do not cover up  the original screw holes with your fabric!  You will need these holes to be easily accessible when it's time to put the screws back in to the base.  You can see in the photo above I cut little half circles of fabric where the screw holes are. 

7.  Attach your newly upholstered seat cushion to the base of the stool/bench.  Just lay the seat cushion on its back, and place the base over it making sure to line up holes on the base, with the screw holes in the bottom of the seat. See photo below. 

TIP:  Sometimes old screws are rusty or just need replacing.  If you are using new screws,  consider these tips:  1.  make sure they are the same length as the old ones 2. Make sure they are long enough to go through the wood base and bench seat, and 3. Make sure the screws aren't so long that they go through your cushion!  That would be a huge bummer. That is why I included tip #1 above: use screws the same size as the old ones were! That way you can be sure they won't go through the cushion. 

Once all screwed in, your little bench is DONE! 

Then you can make more and more of these cute benches.....

These little benches work great for kids' or adult desk seats. They can also stand alone with the only purpose of adding a fun punch of color anywhere in the home! Longer benches are also great for the foot of the bed, an entry-way, or porch. 

Hopefully today's tips will inspire you and take the  "scary" away!  Always start small.  And if doing this on your own sounds awful, just ask me! I'm happy to go bench hunting for, paint it and re-upholster with a fabric of your choice! 

Happy upholstering!  

See related posts below: 

Questions?  contact me! 

Search Website: 

Source: www.novodecorco.com

Re-upholstering benches made easy

Stools and benches are EVERYWHERE in second hand stores.  They are one of the most versatile and easy to update pieces, but often they are quite ugly upon first sight.  If you can look past the ugliness, however, you're one step ahead....and on your way to having an awesome little accent piece for your home. 

Don't let upholstering scare you!  It's easier than it looks.  This is a simple tutorial on what you can do with your bench/stool! 

Here is what you'll need:

  • Staple gun
  • Fabric
  • Fabric scissors
  • screw driver
  • Foam cushion (or pillow "stuffing" sometimes works) You can find these at Hobby Lobby, Joann Fabrics, or Michael's. 
  • Stool or bench (old piano benches are great for this)

 

Consider using fabric with bold patterns and colors that accentuate or compliment your home interior.  

 

 

 

 

 

TIP: fabric scissors work best. If your scissors is even slightly dull, cutting fabric will become a strongly disliked task! Trust me! 

 

 

 

TIP:  foam cushions work best and provide a firmer surface for your bench, but "stuffing" or batting can also work.  Batting that comes in sheets is easier to work with than batting bunched up in a ball.  

The photo to the left shows a sheet of batting. You can double up your layers to create a thicker seat cushion. 

Here's how:

1.  Flip the bench on its back.  You'll see screws in each corner.  Unscrew those using a screw driver.  Once all screws are out, the top of the bench should pop right off.

2.  Remove the old foam and fabric from the wood base.  You will see staples securing the old fabric to the wood base.  To remove the staples use a flat screw driver and try to wiggle your way under the staple. Then pry it up. Sometimes you'll pry off only one end of a taple. If that happens you can use a pliers to pull the other end out. 

3.  Now you have your bare bench/stool frame.  Painting the base is optional but remember to paint before adding the new fabric/upholstery! 

Below is the bench base right after the cushion/seat was removed.    On the right the bench base has been painted green! Just more fun, don't you think?

4.  Cut your foam piece to size.  Your foam or batting layer should be slightly larger (a centimeter or less) than the seat of the bench, on all four sides.  This is necessary so that the hard/wood edges of the bench base are fully covered.   In the picture below, two layers of batting are used instead of a foam cushion.  Either works. 

5.  Once your foam/batting is cut. Cut your fabric.  I usually leave about 2 inhes of extra fabric all the way around the bench base. Having a little more fabric around the edges makes "wrapping" it to the bench a little easier.  In the above picture you can see the fabric extends a couple more inches beyond the batting/base of bench.  

So, this will be the order of your pieces:  1. fabric lying flat, 2. cushion or batting layers laying on top the fabric, 3. bench base (usually made of wood)

6.  Start "wrapping" your base/foam layers like a present.  Start with the corners and work your way around the wood base, pulling tightly and stapling as you go.  Tip: when pulling the fabric, be careful not to pull too hard. You don't want to use up all the fabric on one side, and not have enough left on the other side to pull over your wood base.  

Below the fabric is wrapped around the entire bench base and cushion. Staples secure it to the bottom of the wood base: 

Tip:  When you are wrapping the fabric, do not cover up  the original screw holes with your fabric!  You will need these holes to be easily accessible when it's time to put the screws back in to the base.  You can see in the photo above I cut little half circles of fabric where the screw holes are. 

7.  Attach your newly upholstered seat cushion to the base of the stool/bench.  Just lay the seat cushion on its back, and place the base over it making sure to line up holes on the base, with the screw holes in the bottom of the seat. See photo below. 

TIP:  Sometimes old screws are rusty or just need replacing.  If you are using new screws,  consider these tips:  1.  make sure they are the same length as the old ones 2. Make sure they are long enough to go through the wood base and bench seat, and 3. Make sure the screws aren't so long that they go through your cushion!  That would be a huge bummer. That is why I included tip #1 above: use screws the same size as the old ones were! That way you can be sure they won't go through the cushion. 

Once all screwed in, your little bench is DONE! 

Then you can make more and more of these cute benches.....

These little benches work great for kids' or adult desk seats. They can also stand alone with the only purpose of adding a fun punch of color anywhere in the home! Longer benches are also great for the foot of the bed, an entry-way, or porch. 

Upholstering can seem intimidating. Hopefully today's tips will inspire you and take the  "scary" away!  Always start small.  And like anything new, practice!  Most of all, have fun and don't be afraid to make mistakes! That is how anyone ever got "good" at what they do!!! 

Happy upholstering!  

See related posts below: 

Questions?  contact me! 

Search Website: 

Source: www.novodecorco.com

Friday Finds: hot chic home decor under $5

Hi!  If you've followed Friday Find follower, then you know what today's post is all about. If you are new to Friday Finds, it is a weekly series where I feature a thrifted home decor item.  The purpose is to demonstrate just how many great "finds" are out there (in second-hand shops!), and to give you ideas of what to look for. 

Thrifting is about finding something that isn't brand new, seeing it's unique characteristics and qualities, and using it to enhance a space.  Plain and simple. 

Today's Friday Find is......

Fabric! 

In my experience, I have found there are two fabric shopping experiences in fabric/craft store: 

1.  The uncommon fabric shopping experience

You are browsing the clearance rack, and find the perfect fabric, in a pattern/color you love, in just the right amount of material for your particular project.  All of this on the clerance rack?  Congrats!  You've had a stellar fabric shopping experience, and that's awesome.   

2.  The common fabric shopping experience

Nothing jumped out at you on the clearance rack, except maybe a 2'x'4 piece of fabric, but that's not enough for your Pinterest experiment!  It is quite possible experience number #1 will happen, but if it doesn't and your desperate for fabric, you then find yourself taking out a second mortgage to purchase enough fabric (from the non clearance section) to complete your project.  Pricing range for new fabric is anywhere from several dollars per yard, to $20+ per yard.  It's not cheap! 

But whether you sew or not, today's Friday FInd may result in an even better fabric shopping scenario.  If you are not concerned about becoming a fabric hoarder, read on....

3.  Thrift store fabric shopping experience! 

Go to the sewing or fabric sections of any thrift shop, and you'd be surprised what you find. Thrifted fabrics are particularly great for the non-sewer, because maybe you're experimenting with fabric use, or trying a Pinterest project you thought was awesome (like covering your lamp shade or something). If this is the case, you really don't want to pay top dollar at an actual fabric store!  Price range for thrifted fabric: $0.99-$9.99 (for the bundle; sizing varies, but bottom line is you could pay only $5.99 for three, four, or even five yards of fabric. 

Here is another great reason to shop thrifted fabric:  you could get lucky and find 5 yards of gorgeous, un-used fabric (still with original price tag on).  When this happens, don't second guess it.  I almost always snatch these deals up, even if I have no fabric-related project in my near future!  Below is a 3 yard "bundle" found for under $6: 

Super cute pattern for a stool, bench or pillows in a little girl's room (or mine, as I love pink)

Super cute pattern for a stool, bench or pillows in a little girl's room (or mine, as I love pink)

You might be thinking.....

"Why Fabric?  I don't even sew?!"

There are numerous uses for fabric for the non-sewer!  If you fall into the "non-sewer" category, these ideas might just be what you need to make your linen closet pretty this summer (or something!)  See this list of 5 chic (and smart) uses of fabric for the non-sewer.....

1.  Drawer liner/linen shelf liner (because it's just fun to have pretty drawer interiors)

2.  Line the back of a bookshelf, hutch, or built-in

3.  Cover empty food cans/coffee cans for your kids' art supplies (or your art supplies!)

4.  Cover shoe boxes or larger boxed for "pretty" storage in your home. This is great for cubbies, if you have them!

5.  Re-upholster a chair.....or four!  See my tutorial at this link: Re-upholstering your Dining or Kitchen Chairs

So, next time you spot a cute idea on Pinterest and it involves fabric, don't second guess it! Head to your nearest thrift store or two, and start that search!  I guarantee you will find something that works! 

Have you used fabric in non-traditional ways?  What was the outcome??

Have a wonderful weekend! 

 

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Two Chairs; Two Styles: Diamonds in the Rough REVEAL

Hello!  Today I bring you a blog post featuring two really great chairs with two very different styles!   Different they are, but placed in the same room.....dynamite.   Do you love an eclectic mix like I do?   From different furniture styles, to colors, and accessories, a room with an array of different things is a fun room to be in.  And I'm pretty certain that a room with these two chairs in it, would meet the criteria for fun!  

CHAIR #1:   Mid-century modern accent chair

This is a simple accent chair with clean lines.  I would call this style mid-century modern.  It is a great example of a piece that certainly stands on its own, but when thrown into the mix of a room, it's even better!  Its neutral color and bold pattern compliment each other well.  Here is a look at the chair before and after it's make-over: 

Tip:  upholstered chairs are a great way to experiment with patterns.  You don't have to start with the largest textile in the room like curtains to find out whether you like pattern or not.   That would be scary experimenting with an item that large!  Just start small! 

With its good bones, great structure, a vision, and a little TLC (okay, alot of TLC!)  a chair with attitude was born. And I certainly won't take credit for the "vision" part....as its owner had the idea for a neutral gray base color with a bold patterned upholstery!  Awesome job Denise! If you missed the last post on this chair, here's a peek at an area that needed quite a bit of elbow grease:

Nothing that sanding cannot fix!  And here is it's fresh new look:

Chair #2:  Rocking Chair

The second chair is an old rocking chair that was freshened up with some chalk paint, sandpaper, and a polyurethane finish  (matte finish).  A matte finish is a good choice when you don't necessarily want shine to your piece.  This old rocking chair really just needed to keep its "old" vibe, hence, the chalk paint, distressing, and matte finish. 

I realized that I do not have a "before" picture of this rocking chair for you!  Shoot!   I do, however, have an after shot....(the most fun shot anyway!)

I left the wicker as it was, and just painted over its previous darker/painted finish.  Now the rocker is a great mix of neutrals and naturals, and with a great throw blanket or an accent pillow it is complete. I know this chair will "rock" its new look in any room of the house!  

And that is an example of two very different styles, but styles that CAN be in the same space! Try mixing up your furniture!   

Which of these two chairs is more of your style?  Maybe you like both? Do you have an old rocking chair that needs a little TLC?  Or maybe you've thought about re-upholstering your dining or kitchen chairs? See these related posts below......   

See other related posts:

Chair Upgrade: Diamond in the Rough

Reupholstering your Dining Chairs











Re-upholstering your Dining or Kitchen Chairs

With the current kitchen set renovation in progress I thought I'd post a quick and easy tutorial on how to re-upholster chairs.   I'm talking about the chairs that have a cushion-y seat and can easily pop out once your unscrew them from the bottom.   I aspire to mastering "major" re-upholstering jobs like wing backs, ottomans and such; but for now I'm sticking with what I know!  

Let's start with some basic considerations and tips for a simple chair re-upholstering project:      

1.  Good Bones:

Ideally your chair should be intact; because once you start using your staple gun on that thing, you definitely don't want it crumbling to pieces on you!   Plus, there is no sense in spending time and money re-upholstering if the chair won't last much longer.  

2.   Cushion Seats

Chairs with cushion seats that easily pop out once unscrewed from the bottom are great for re-upholstering.  Tip: make sure you keep the screws with the appropriate chair bottom/cushion and chair. This will make putting them back together much easier.   Number the chair bottom (under a leg) and put the hardware/wood bottom for that chair together labeled in the same way.  I learned this the hard way and had to test all the cushions on each chair for the best fit possible.  Below is an example of a chair suitable for re-upholstering! 

 

This is what the chair looks like once the wood seat and cushion are removed. 

This is what the chair looks like once the wood seat and cushion are removed. 

3.  Fabric

Choosing fabric can be a challenge, but if you know your color scheme and style preference (floral, geometric, solid color, stripe, etc.)  that helps!   It's OK not to know though....you might enjoy just looking at all the fabrics and choosing one that catches your eye.  In that case you may have to plan your room around the fabric you choose.  Consider the material/fabric type also!  If you have young kiddos and you are re-doing your kitchen chairs, you might think about trying a wipe-able fabric.    Or choose darker colors if there will be tons of kid traffic on them. 

4.  Supplies Needed

For this project you will need a fabric scissors and fabric, staple gun, and a flat surface to work on.  I use a carpeted floor.  When you staple the fabric onto the chair bottom, you need to press hard so the staple goes in all the way.  You don't want a flimsy or slippery surface to work on for that reason!   As far as amount of fabric needed, I just completed a re-upholstering job and I used about two yards of fabric for 4 large dining chairs (pictured above).  If you aren't sure how much fabric you need, just ask someone at the fabric store....they are so helpful! 

5.  Cutting your Fabric

When you cut you fabric allow about 3-4 inches around the perimeter of the chair bottom so you can bring up the edges onto the back of the chair.    It looks like this: 

I usually end up trimming the fabric as I go because I always start with more than I need. Better to have too much, then not enough!   

6.  wrapping the chair bottom and cushion

In my experience It is easiest to start with the corners.  Start by pulling the corner of the fabric over the corner of the chair.  Secure it by stapling it in place.  See below: 

Then you can pull each side straight onto the chair edge, so there is overlap with the corner piece you just stapled.    This is pictured below: 

Once the corners are secured, you are ready for the sides.  Make sure you are pulling tightly so the fabric is tight against the chair cushion on the other side.   I staple usually every couple inches or more if needed.   Make sure you note where the nail holes in the chair bottom are so you don't cover them up with the fabric.  You will need easy access to those holes once it's time to screw the seat back into the chair. I usually trim around the nail holes see I can seem them easily:

Once you have the perimeter tightly secured with staples, then the fun part begins!  Putting them back into the chairs! 

7.  Screwing cushions back into chair frames

I would recommend having someone help you with this step.   One person can lie under the chair ready to screw the screws back in, and the other person can push down on the cushion from the top.  This will help ensure the seat is on tight and is flush against your chair frame.  

And that is it!  It is a fairly simple project, though it seems that for these "simple" projects I always experience some type of equipment malfunction!   Seriously!  Live and learn.    

I hope you took something away from this mini tutorial.  It takes a little practice.....and patience. I didn't get my groove until the third of four chairs today!  Do you have any chair candidates stored away in your basement or garage?   See what you already have, and give it a try!  I'd love to hear how it went!  

Happy almost Friday and a sincere "thank you" for checking in today!